Articles:

Why Is My Car Battery Dying So Fast?

Why Is My Car Battery Dying So Fast?

Why is my car battery draining so fast? Your modern car’s battery is responsible for powering far more than ever before.  Many cars run self check and diagnostic routines while parked. Proximity sensors may stay active. Alarms are active on virtually every newer car or truck. None of these systems require a lot of power, but if the vehicle isn’t driven regularly, the battery will run down.  Batteries that drain fast may be suffering from an alternator that is not charging properly, or the battery itself may be weak. Another option is an open circuit that continues to draw power after the vehicle is turned off.  Modern vehicles have sophisticated controls and sensors that require a steady source of power to work properly. A weak or damaged battery cannot provide the consistent power needed for all the vehicle systems.  Not long ago a battery replacement was as easy as taking the old one out and installing a new one. A diagnostic check of the charging ... read more

What Can Cause a Car's Brake Rotors to Warp?

What Can Cause a Car's Brake Rotors to Warp?

The brake rotors are the large discs that you see behind the wheel of the car. They spin along with the wheel so that the brake pads clamp them and stop the wheels when you press the brakes. This process involves lots of friction and heat. They also swiftly dissipate the heat to allow brakes to function with rapid pedal presses. Unfortunately, the disc surface may become uneven from wear and tear, causing the braking to become less effective and bumpy. This is called warping. For the warping to happen, the brake discs must be defective, and a tremendous amount of heat is present. The heat alone may not cause warping as rotors can withstand lots of heat. Here are some of the major causes of rotor warping. Glazing the Rotor with the Brake Pad Material Brake pads are made of a softer material than rotors. If they get very hot from high-speed braking or pressing the brakes hard for a long time, they tend to get too soft and cake-in some material on the rotors. The rotors are then unable ... read more

Why Is My Check Engine Light On?

Why Is My Check Engine Light On?

Why is my Check Engine Light on? That is a great question! It’s a question that may have a million answers and that’s only a slight exaggeration. Modern vehicles have sophisticated engine and body control modules that monitor and control virtually everything that happens in your vehicle. When something is amiss, it may trigger the Check Engine Light. If the issue is serious and warrants immediate service the Check Engine Light will flash.  If certain combinations of fault or error conditions occur the vehicle may go into Limp Mode. This allows the vehicle to be driven a short distance at low speed to ensure you are able to get the vehicle to a safe location, i.e., out of the flow of traffic.  Sometimes all the lights on the dash will light up. Some refer to this as a Christmas Tree. One thing is certain: When it looks like all the lights are on, your vehicle needs to visit a quality automobile repair shop as soon as possible.   Answering why the check engi ... read more

Why Do My Brakes Squeak?

Why Do My Brakes Squeak?

Zero to sixty is a fine measure of a vehicle’s performance. Braking performance may well be equally important, if less popular. Early cars had hand bakes. Soon enough cars had mechanical brakes. The basics of braking systems didn’t change dramatically until the advent of anti-lock brakes.  Brakes pads are pressed against rotors or drums to slow the vehicle. Worn components can squeak or squeal. Severely worn brakes may grind or whine. Some brakes alert vehicle owners the pads need replacing by chirping.  Much of the braking energy is converted to heat which is why brake parts are made of materials that can withstand high temperatures. Please note braking too much, especially when going down steep grades can quickly overheat even the best brakes. Downshift and let engine braking maintain a safe speed. Asbestos was commonly used in brake parts until recently, making exposure a risk for anyone working with brakes; a compelling reason to consider having brake mai ... read more

Shocks and Struts and Springs - What About My Suspension?

Shocks and Struts and Springs - What About My Suspension?

What about the parts of your car you never see?  The smallest ding or scratch will catch your attention, but a bent steering control arm?  If you’re like most people, you’d never see it.  You wouldn’t see it without a comprehensive Vehicle Health Assessment like Haglin Automotive’s customers get.  Our ASE Certified Technicians apply their knowledge and troubleshooting skills to carefully inspecting the major components and systems.  The suspension is responsible for passenger comfort and vehicle integrity, true, but one of the most important reasons for the suspension system is to keep the vehicle in contact with the road. Imagine hitting a bump and bouncing down the road until the energy is dissipated. The tires must stay on the road for the car to effectively speed up, slow down or turn.  Many people are shocked (pardon the pun) when they replace their shock absorbers or struts and find their vehicle rides so much better! One ... read more

Does Oil Go Bad Sitting in An Engine?

Does Oil Go Bad Sitting in An Engine?

When it comes to engine oil, how old is too old? Can it actually go bad by sitting in the engine for six months or even a year? Well, you are required to change your car's engine oil every 3000 to 5000 miles. However, if your oil container indicates a shelf life, you might want to work with those specific dates. Your car's engine oil plays a crucial role in lubricating the engine parts which are in constant motion. This prevents the components from rubbing against each other, reducing the friction that leads to wear and tear. Suffice to say, constant use exposes your oil to excess heat, which breaks it down, reducing its functionality. Besides, various hydrocarbon and water elements eventually contaminate your car's engine oil with continued use. Your car's engine oil longevity depends on several factors, including the oil type. For instance, conventional motor oil tends to break down much faster at high temperatures. Fortunately, you can alternatively go for syntheti ... read more

Gasoline Direct Injection Service Challenges

Gasoline Direct Injection Service Challenges

Photo Credit: BG Website Fuel injection has been in use for many years because it greatly increases efficiency.  Computer controls direct a precise amount of gasoline to be injected at the moment of the intake stroke.  The amount of fuel depends on information from an array of sensors including engine temperature, ambient temperature, and oxygen levels, for example, along with input from the driver pushing on the accelerator pedal. In the past ten years or so automobile manufacturers have transitioned to “direct injection” fuel injection because it offers more power and reduced emissions.  The main difference between traditional and direct fuel injection is the point of fuel delivery. “Direct” refers to fuel being injected directly into the cylinder immediately prior to the spark which ignites the gasoline instead of the fuel spray being pulled into the cylinder.  That difference means the detergents in the gasoline never come in contact ... read more

Signs Your Serpentine Belt is Failing

Signs Your Serpentine Belt is Failing

Signs Your Serpentine Belt is Failing A serpentine belt's job is to drive the auxiliary functions of your vehicle. It charges your battery and operates functions such as the power steering, coolant system, and air conditioner. Serpentine belts have a long lifespan and generally last for up to 100 thousand miles. So if you've been driving a lot recently and are having problems with your serpentine belt, it may be suffering from wear and tear and need to be replaced. Let's look at the signs your serpentine belt is failing. Squeaking Noise One of the main signs that your serpentine belt isn't working as effectively as it should be is that you'll hear a squeaking or squealing noise while you drive. A squeaky serpentine belt can be caused by several reasons; it may have been improperly maintained or could have been affected by environmental factors. Wear and Tear Serpentine belts start to stretch with age and can e ... read more

Wheel Alignment or Tire Balance - Which Do You Need?

Wheel Alignment or Tire Balance - Which Do You Need?

When it comes to vehicle maintenance, you can't afford to wait until the last minute to get things done. It can be difficult to determine which services your vehicle requires. Wheel alignment and tire balance services are often confused with one another. Here's what you need to know about wheel alignment, tire balance, and when they will benefit your vehicle. What is a Wheel Alignment? Wheel alignment is when the angles of your car's wheels are adjusted to meet the manufacturer's specifications. This type of alignment is also referred to as tracking or breaking, and it is part of your car's standard maintenance schedule. What is Tire Balance? Tire balance describes the amount of mass that is distributed between your car's tires or the wheels as a whole, including the rim that is mounted upon. Wheel Alignment vs. Tire Balance Wheel alignment and tire balance services are often mistaken for one another, but they are two different auto services. Whee ... read more

What is an engine misfire?

What is an engine misfire?

A properly functioning vehicle is a result of multiple, closely-held components that work efficiently, and in harmony. Any flaw in the operation of these units can tip the balance towards problems that hamper the performance of the car apparatus. An engine misfire is a perfect example of an issue that arises due to the faulty operation of one or more components in a smoothly running system. What is Engine Misfire? How does an engine work? To understand the concept of a misfiring engine, it is imperative to understand its normal operations. Most modern cars run on a precise 4-stroke combustion cycle happening in closed cylinders called 'pistons.' The 4 strokes are: Intake- Upward movement of pistons to let the air and gas inside the cylinder. Compression- The air and gas mixture is compressed into a smaller space. Combustion- Ignition, and explosion of compressed gases to push the piston out producing a burst of power ... read more

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